Hmmm…

Hmmm…

Update: An article about the reaction to the original RedState article:

BTW, that article points out that the original article was a derivative of the original RedState piece, which might be this:

Hmmm…

Update (related item):

 

Hmmm…

No, I am not on a COVID-19 kick today…just saw multiple, interesting items about it…

Hmmm…

 

Hmmm…

You will find that people unwilling to work will either take advantage of others or be humiliated by them.

A Calendar of Wisdom: Daily Thoughts to Nourish the Soul, Written and Selected from the World’s Sacred Texts by Leo Tolstoy (translated by Peter Sekirin)

Notice, it does not say “unable to work.” Also, I suspect that the “or” should be “and/or.”

Based on what I’ve read of this book, Tolstoy is a kind person, so he isn’t trying to be judgmental, cruel, or harsh. Instead, true love means telling people the truth, and an unwillingness to work is not a characteristic you or I should want to have. It’s not good for us. It’s not good for others.

Today’s Devotional Thoughts

Hmmm…

If your eyes become blinded by the sun, you do not say that the sun does not exist. In the same way, you should not say that God does not exist if your intellect is lost in trying to understand him.

A Calendar of Wisdom: Daily Thoughts to Nourish the Soul, Written and Selected from the World’s Sacred Texts by Leo Tolstoy (translated by Peter Sekirin)

“Cato practiced the kind of public speech capable of moving the masses, believing proper political philosophy takes care like any great city to maintain the warlike element. But he was never seen practicing in front of others, and no one ever heard him rehearse a speech. When he was told that people blamed him for his silence, he replied, ‘Better they not blame my life. I begin to speak only when I’m certain what I’ll say isn’t better left unsaid.’”

—PLUTARCH, CATO THE YOUNGER, 4

The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living by Ryan Holiday

Of course God knew what would happen if they [creatures with free will] used their freedom the wrong way: apparently He thought it worth the risk. Perhaps we feel inclined to disagree with Him. But there is a difficulty about disagreeing with God. He is the source from which all your reasoning power comes: you could not be right and He wrong any more than a stream can rise higher than its own source. When you are arguing against Him you are arguing against the very power that makes you able to argue at all: it is like cutting off the branch you are sitting on. If God thinks this state of war in the universe a price worth paying for free will—that is, for making a live world in which creatures can do real good or harm and something of real importance can happen, instead of a toy world which only moves when He pulls the strings—then we may take it it is worth paying.

—from Mere Christianity

A Year with C.S. Lewis: Daily Readings from His Classic Works by C.S. Lewis

Our destinies in life will never be determined by our complaining spirits or high expectations. Life is full of surprises, and the adjustment of our attitudes is a lifelong project.

The pessimist complains about the wind.
The optimist expects it to change.
The leader adjusts the sails.

— The Maxwell Daily Reader: 365 Days of Insight to Develop the Leader Within You and Influence Those Around You by John C. Maxwell

Hmmm…

Hmmm…

It is better to know several basic rules of life than to study many unnecessary sciences. The major rules of life will stop you from evil and show you the good path in life; but the knowledge of many unnecessary sciences may lead you into the temptation of pride, and stop you from understanding the basic rules of life.

A Calendar of Wisdom: Daily Thoughts to Nourish the Soul, Written and Selected from the World’s Sacred Texts by Leo Tolstoy (translated by Peter Sekirin)

“A Morning Ritual”

The Thinker LEGO sculpture by Nathan SawayaAsk yourself the following first thing in the morning:

  • What am I lacking in attaining freedom from passion?
  • What for tranquility?
  • What am I? A mere body, estate-holder, or reputation? None of these things.
  • What, then? A rational being.
  • What then is demanded of me? Meditate on your actions.
  • How did I steer away from serenity?
  • What did I do that was unfriendly, unsocial, or uncaring?
  • What did I fail to do in all these things?”

EPICTETUS, DISCOURSES, 4.6.34–35

The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living by Ryan Holiday

The Thinker LEGO sculpture by Nathan Sawaya

I used a service/app called Canva to do a background removal, so I can use Nathan Sawaya’s “The Thinker” LEGO sculpture as the “emoji” for posts where I want to get people to think about something. 🙂

The Thinker LEGO sculpture by Nathan Sawaya

Please check out what it looked like before (along with many of his other sculpures) in this earlier post from our visit to the Denver Museum of Nature & Science.

Oh, I am very impressed at how effective and simple Canva’s background remover was. Literally a single click. Okay, two…I had to choose “Effects” first. 🙂